Anne Arundel School Board, Unions, Agree to Increase in Drug Copays

As part of an effort to curb health care cost for the Anne Arundel County Public School System, three of the schools’ unions agreed to increases in copays for some prescriptions drugs to save the school system about $400,000. The three-year agreement starts in 2018.

As reported by The Capital Gazette,

The school system’s health care fund has faced about a $20 million deficit in the past two years. Medical costs rose and the school system has been expanding its staff. Earlier this year, the school system transferred $2 million from a surplus fund to pay for health care. County Executive Steve Schuh also transferred $5 million from the county budget to help pay for health care for school employees and avoid drastic actions, such as furloughs and layoffs.

Schuh and school officials have said they need to shift some costs of the health insurance to employees to make the fund sustainable.

The agreement between the school board, Teachers Association of Anne Arundel County, the Association of Educational Leaders, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees increases copays for preferred prescription drugs to $20 and non-preferred brand prescriptions to $35. Those unions represent teachers, administrators and maintenance workers respectively. Generic drugs will continue to cost $5.

School staff that belong to those three unions now have copays of $15 for preferred brands and $25 for non-preferred brand.

Under the plan, a new tier called specialty prescriptions, which are defined as injectables with the exception of insulin, would have a copay of $50 in 2018, $65 in 2019 and $75 in 2020.

The agreement also allows specialty prescriptions to be redefined after Jan. 1, 2019.

School officials’ effort to curb costs include an agreement with CareFirst that saves the school system $16.9 million over a three-year period, starting in 2018.

County officials are also asking the State Board of Education to allow the county government to make a one-time allocation of $22.5 million for school health care costs for the fiscal year beginning July 1. This would exempt the school system from the state law that requires the level of per-pupil funding in one year to be matched in all subsequent years.

The state agency is expected to respond by the end of the month.

Read the full article for more information.

Wicomico County’s Budget Proposal Benefits from Real Property Base

Wicomico County Executive Culver has presented his proposed operating budget to the County Council.

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Wicomico County’s proposed operating budget total is a 6.2% increase over the current year’s budget. 

As described in the Wicomico County Budget proposal, a continued increase in the County’s net assessable real property base and a positive trend in employment support county investments in services, while allowing the county to maintain current tax rates.

Here are a few highlights from the budget as described in the budget summary and as reported by the Salisbury Independent:

Total Operating Budget

  • “The budget formally presented Tuesday to the County Council totals $143.7 million, a 6.2 percent increase over the current year’s budget of $135.2 million,” according to the Independent.

Education Funding

  • The budget satistifies the maintenance of effort requirement for the county, including an increaseof more than $1 million required by the maintenance of effort escalator.

Taxes

  • Tax rates remain unchanged in the proposed budget.

Government Employee Salaries

  • Eligible employees will receive a 2% COLA and Communications Operators will receive a salary increase.

For more information, see Culver unveils $143.7 million spending plan from the Salisbury Independent and the proposed operating budget for Wicomico County.

Howard County’s Proposed Budget ‘Holds the Line’ on Taxes

Howard County Executive Kittleman has presented his proposed operating budget to the County Council.

Here are a few highlights of the budget from the budget summary document.

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Howard County’s $1.58 billion proposed budget maintains tax rates while providing extra funding for education.

Total Operating Budget

  • “$1.58 billion, a 5.6 percent growth from last year’s budget. . . Excluding one-time resources (use of prior fund balance for one-time expenses), the proposed General Fund budget represents an increase of $39.3 million, or 3.7 percent over FY 2017.”

 

Education Funding

  • “This proposed budget includes a $572.2 million direct appropriation for HCPSS, $10 million higher than prior year and $2.3 million above the required Maintenance of Effort (MOE) level.”

Taxes

  • “As with the Capital Budget, this budget was carefully prepared to address our residents’ priorities and our county’s challenges while holding the line on taxes and incorporating a fiscally prudent approach.”

Government Employee Salaries

  • “This budget provides funding for a well-deserved cost of living increase and step increments for general county employees and for negotiated salary increases for employees covered by collective bargaining agreements. The budget also continues our effort to convert contingent employees who work full-time hours to full-time positions with full benefits. To date, we have converted 49 positions and the FY 2018 budget will continue that effort.”

For more information, see the entire proposed operating budget for Howard County.

Baltimore County School Board to Start Search for Interim Superintendent

The Baltimore County school board is planning to begin the search soon for an interim superintendent to replace Dallas Dance, who abruptly announced Tuesday that he will leave his job at the end of June.

According to The Baltimore Sun,

Board President Edward Gilliss said he believes the board must select an interim superintendent to serve for at least a year because there isn’t enough time to find a permanent replacement.

“The two choices are either an internal candidate or someone from the outside,” he said. “Our objective is to identify a person to serve for a 12-month period.”

Dance, who is in his fifth year as superintendent in the sprawling suburban county, is stepping aside after the first year of a four year contract.

He said he does not have another job but is considering offers. He said he was leaving for family reasons, and because working 18-hour days had become taxing.

Board member Marisol Johnson said the board is planning to have an emergency meeting in about a week to begin the search process.

She believes the board should look at internal candidates before beginning a national search. She said there are administrators inside the system who are qualified to do the job. She declined to identify them.

Dance has two top lieutenants. Verletta White, the chief academic officer for the 112,000 student school system, and Kevin Smith, the chief administrative operations officer, who oversees the district’s $1.4 billion budget.

Dance’s resignation gives the board just 10 weeks to find a replacement — an uncommonly short period, according to John Woolums, director of governmental relations for the Maryland Association of Boards of Education.

Maryland school systems, particularly those in urban areas, tend to take more time to choose a superintendent, Woolums said, because the jobs are so big.

“So it is quite often the case that an interim is selected to allow the board to engage in a more thorough process,” Woolums said. “Given the short time line, it is predictable that they would look in-house.”

The school system faces the likelihood of substantial change in 2018, when the board goes from an entirely appointed body to one that is mostly elected. For that reason, some board members suggested an interim might be brought in to serve two years.

Under a new state law, county voters will elect seven school board members in November 2018, and four members will be appointed by Gov. Larry Hogan the following month.

Board members will have to decide whether they want to hire a new superintendent just months before a turnover of the majority of the board.

It’s uncommon for a superintendent to leave in the first year of a multiyear contract, and to announce the departure so late in a school year. But it does happen.

The superintendent in Washington County, Woolums noted, announced in January that he would be leaving in March. The school board chose a top administrator as an interim and then named him the permanent replacement.

Read the full article for more information.

Anne Arundel Board Redistricts Annapolis Schools

Anne Arundel County Board of Education voted Wednesday night to change school boundaries for nearly 400 students on the Annapolis Peninsula, shifting students to reduce crowding and bring students closer to their neighborhood schools.

According to The Capital Gazette,

County leaders and some parents have advocated for reducing crowding at Tyler Heights Elementary School in past years. The school has 13 portable classrooms and sends its pre-kindergarten students to Georgetown East Elementary School.

Under the plan, Tyler Heights would go from 133 percent over state-rated capacity to 99.5 percent capacity, according to the redistricting report.

Monarch Academy in Annapolis will draw students from the Tyler Heights area when it opens in the fall. Tyler Heights Elementary will also get a construction upgrade, which would expand school space.

The redistricting plan moves students from Tyler Heights Elementary to Eastport and Georgetown East elementary schools, as well as shift graduates of Walter S. Mills-Parole Elementary School from Wiley H. Bates Middle School to Annapolis Middle School. Hillsmere Elementary is the only elementary school in the Annapolis feeder system whose boundaries will remain unchanged.

Some students living north of the Severn River would move from Annapolis Elementary School to Arnold Elementary School in the 2019-20 school year. And some students would move from Germantown Elementary School to Annapolis Elementary School in that school year as well.

Fourth-grade students affected by the plan have the option of remaining at their school the next school year. Students living in the Mills-Parole Elementary attendance zone and going to school at Bates Middle can also remain next school year.

The proposal to graduate Mills-Parole Elementary students from one middle school to another had raised some concerns among parents because the shift will concentrate minority students in Annapolis Middle. Mills-Parole Elementary has a student body with 59 percent Hispanic students and 36 percent African-American students.

School board president Stacy Korbelak said parents have the option of choosing a middle school because both Annapolis Middle and Bates Middle are magnet schools.

Seven board members voted unanimously to approve the plan. Board member Eric Grannon was absent. And board member Tom Frank resigned earlier in the year.

Read the full article for more information.

DLS 90 Day Report: Education Funding

The Department of Legislative Services (DLS) has released its annual summary of the legislative session, The 90 Day Report – A Review of the 2017 Legislative SessionThe report is divided into 12 parts, each dealing with a major policy area. It also includes information relating to the final operating and capital budgets, including aid to local governments – and a breakdown of aid to each county. 

County level detail of state aid is available here.

DLS lists “Direct Aid” to counties in two groups: Primary and Secondary Education, and all other aid programs. A full breakdown of all programs is available here: Total State Aid to Local Governments (Exhibit A-3.5)

This blog post directs readers to sections of the 90 Day Report which describe the education programs.

From Part L, Education of the Report:

State aid for primary and secondary education increases by $61.1 million in fiscal 2018 to $6.4 billion, 1.0 % more than fiscal 2017 aid. State aid provided directly to the local boards of education increases by $113.6 million, or 2.1%, while retirement aid decreases by $52.5 million, or 6.7%. Fiscal 2017 to 2018 changes in major State education aid programs are shown in Exhibit L-1.

The foundation program totals $3.0 billion in fiscal 2018, an increase of $43.3 million over fiscal 2017, or 1.5%. This increase is attributable to enrollment growth of 0.8% (6,658 full-time equivalent (FTE) students) and a 0.7% increase in the per pupil foundation amount due to inflation. The increase in the per pupil foundation amount brought it from $6,964 per pupil in fiscal 2017 to $7,012 per pupil in fiscal 2018.

Aside from the foundation program, the largest single increase is $21.7 million for Limited English Proficiency.

The County level detail begins with a list of aid provided through primary and secondary education programs. The Primary and Secondary Education section of Part A provides detailed descriptions, history and funding amounts for public school programs, of which there are many:

  • Foundation Program ($3.0 billion),
  • Net Taxable Income Grants ($49.2 million),
  • Declining Enrollment and Tax Increment Financing Grants ($17.6 million),
  • Geographic Cost of Education Index ($139.1 million),
  • Compensatory Education Program ($1.3 billion),
  • public special education programs ($284.9 million),
  • funding for nonpublic special education placements ($123.6 million),
  • regular student transportation services ($250.6 million),
  • special student transportation services ($25.7 million),
  • limited English proficiency grants ($248.7 million),
  • Bridge to Excellence in Public Schools Act Guaranteed Tax Base Program ($50.3 million),
  • Public School Opportunities Enhancement Program ($2.5 million),*
  • Robotics Grant Program ($250,000),*
  • Next Generation Scholars of Maryland Program ($4.7 million),*
  • Early College Innovative Fund ($300,000),*
  • Aging Schools Program ($6.1 million),
  • Judy Hoyer and Head Start Programs ($12.4 million),
  • Infants and Toddlers Program ($10.4 million),
  • Teacher Induction, Retention, and Advancement Pilot Program ($2.1 million),
  • Governor’s Teacher Excellence Award Program ($96,000),
  • Food and Nutrition Services ($11.2 million),
  • Adult Education Programs ($8 million),
  • School-based Health Centers ($2.6 million),
  • Healthy Families/Home Visits Program ($4.6 million),
  • Prekindergarten funding ($8.0 million),
  • Prekindergarten supplemental grants ($10.9 million), and
  • Teachers’ retirement payments ($734.5 million).

*Governor’s proposed budget did not fund these programs, but the General Assembly restored them.

Governor Hogan provided a supplemental budget which provided additional education aid to school systems experiencing declining enrollment, and those providing prekindergarten. From page A-22:

On March 27, 2017, Governor Hogan provided a supplemental budget that included $28.2 million in education aid to provide grants to certain [local education agencies, or] LEAs, all of which was contingent on the enactment of House Bill 684. As directed under the bill, this funding is provided in two parts: (1) enrollment based supplemental grants and (2) prekindergarten supplemental grants.

An LEA is eligible for an enrollment based supplemental grant if it has declining enrollment, as determined by the LEA’s most recent prior three-year moving average FTE exceeding its FTE in the previous school year. In fiscal 2018, the eligible LEAs include Baltimore City and Allegany, Calvert, Carroll, Cecil, Garrett, Harford, Kent, Queen Anne’s, and Talbot counties. The supplemental budget provides $17.2 million for these grants.

An LEA is eligible for a prekindergarten supplemental grant based on it offering a full-day public prekindergarten program for all four-year olds whose parents enroll them. In fiscal 2018, the eligible LEAs include Baltimore City and Garrett, Kent, and Somerset counties. The supplemental budget includes $10.9 million for these grants.

From page A-79 on Teacher Retirement:

House Bill 152 (Ch. 23), the Budget Reconciliation and Financing Act (BRFA) of 2017, repeals the requirement, for fiscal 2018 only, that the Governor include an appropriation to the State Retirement and Pension System trust fund equal to one-half of the amount by which the unappropriated general fund surplus exceeds $10.0 million in the second preceding fiscal year, up to a maximum of $50.0 million. State retirement aid to local jurisdictions is reduced by a total of $37.7 million in fiscal 2018: $35.6 million for public schools; $1.5 million for community colleges; and $0.6 million for libraries. These differences are shown by county in Exhibit A-3.2.

Also, House Bill 1109 (Ch. 5) relieves county boards of education from their fiscal 2017 obligation to pay $19.7 million of their share of the employer normal cost for their employees who are members of the Teachers’ Retirement System or Teachers’ Pension System. This measure, which is accounted for in the budget, effectively increases State retirement aid by $19.7 million in fiscal 2017.

 

Deeper in the Report, DLS further discusses House Bill 1109Exhibit C-1 shows the amount that each local school system is relieved of paying in fiscal 2017.

 

More information on Education funding is available in Part L, Education.

DLS 90 Day Report: Local Aid

The Department of Legislative Services (DLS) has released its annual summary of the legislative session, The 90 Day Report – A Review of the 2017 Legislative SessionThe report is divided into 12 parts, each dealing with a major policy area. It also includes information relating to the final operating and capital budgets, including aid to local governments – and a breakdown of aid to each county. 

County level detail of state aid is available here.

DLS lists “Direct Aid” to counties in two groups: Primary and Secondary Education, and all other aid programs. A full breakdown of all programs is available here: Total State Aid to Local Governments (Exhibit A-3.5)

This blog post directs readers to sections of the 90 Day Report which describe all other aid programs.

Libraries

This item includes the Library Formula and Library Network programs. The Report discusses funding for Local Libraries, including the Library Aid Program, for which the State funds 40 percent and counties fund 60 percent:

The State/local share of the minimum program varies by county depending on local wealth. The per resident amount is set at $15.00 for fiscal 2018 and is scheduled to increase to $16.70 annually, beginning in fiscal 2022. Fiscal 2018 funding totals $37.7 million, a $1.3 million increase compared to fiscal 2017. In addition, Baltimore City will receive $3.0 million to support expanded operations throughout the library system.

The State also provides funds through the Library Network program to libraries designated as resource centers and regional resource centers.

Community Colleges

This item includes the Community College Formula (Cade), Grants for English as a Second Language (ESOL) Programs, Optional Retirement, Small College Grants, and Other Community College Aid.

The Report discusses community colleges, which receive $235.2 million in fiscal 2018 through the Senator John A. Cade Formula, an increase of $779,600 over fiscal 2017 funding. In addition, the budget includes $4 million for one-time supplemental grants, to be divided among all 16 community colleges based on Cade funding formula-eligible enrollment. Also,

State funding in fiscal 2018 will total $4.1 million for the small college grants and $600,000 for the Allegany/Garrett counties unrestricted grants. Senate Bill 521 (passed) increases unrestricted grants to small colleges by approximately $1.7 million annually, beginning in fiscal 2019. Funding for statewide and regional programs will total $6.4 million. The English as a Second Language Program will receive $5.5 million, nearly level with the prior year.

Health Formula Grant

Local health departments receive $51.1 million, which level-funds the departments at fiscal 2017 levels, and provides an additional $1.6 million for increases in contractual health insurance costs in certain counties.

Transportation

Transportation aid listed in DLS’ county breakdowns includes highway user revenues to both the county and its municipalities, special transportation grants to both the county and its municipalities, elderly /disabled transportation grants, and paratransit grants.

In highway user revenues (HUR), $140.8 million (7.7% of HUR) is distributed to Baltimore City; $27.4 million (1.5%) is distributed to counties; and $7.3 million (0.4%) is distributed to municipalities, for a total of $175.5 million. The budget also provides special transportation grants to counties and municipalities of $38.4 million – $5.5 million for Baltimore City, $12.8 million for counties, and $20.1 million for municipalities. In addition, local governments receive $4.3 million in elderly /disabled transportation grants, and $1.7 million in paratransit grants.

Additional information on local transportation aid is available within the Report here.

Police and Public Safety

Police and public safety aid listed in DLS’ county breakdowns includes aid provided to municipalities, as well as the county.

The State fiscal 2018 budget level funds the police aid formula at the fiscal 2017 level of $73.7 million. In addition, State funding for targeted public safety grants will total $26.6 million in fiscal 2018. The Report details a handful of public safety grant programs available to local governments, including:

  • The Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Fund, which funds grants for investigating Internet crimes against children ($2 million);
  • The Community Program Fund, which funds local government community and violence intervention programs ($500,000); and
  • The Vehicle Theft Prevention Fund, which enhances the prosecution and adjudication of vehicle theft crimes ($1.9 million).

This item may also include other grants, State’s Attorney’s Grants, and 9-1-1 Grants. 9-1-1 Emergency Systems Grants reimburse counties for improvements and enhancements to their 9-1-1 systems and are funded at $14.4 million.

Fire and Rescue Aid

Fire and rescue aid listed in DLS’ county breakdowns includes aid provided to municipalities, as well as the county. The Senator William H. Amoss Fire, Rescue, and Ambulance Fund, for local and volunteer fire, rescue, and ambulance services, is funded at $15 million.

Recreation and Natural Resources

According to the Report, the local share of Program Open Space (POS) funding changes in fiscal 2018:

Chapter 10 of 2016 altered the local share of POS funding beginning in fiscal 2018. The legislation allocated an additional $11.0 million to local funding for fiscal 2018. In future years, local funding through fiscal 2029 increases overall due to general fund appropriations to the transfer tax special fund (from which the local share of POS receives funding) representing reimbursement for prior transfers from the fund. In fiscal 2018, the POS formula allocates $37.2 million to the counties, which is an increase of $15.5 million over the fiscal 2017 amount. In addition, Baltimore City will receive $3.5 million in special POS funding.

The Report further details Program Open Space funding here.

Also, $7 million is included for the Department of the Environment to provide grants to local governments to provide enhanced nutrient removal at wastewater treatment facilities.

Disparity Grants

Disparity grants were level-funded by the Governor, then partially restored for some counties by the General Assembly. From the Report:

Disparity grants were initiated to address the differences in the abilities of counties to raise revenues from the local income tax, which is one of the larger revenue sources for counties. Counties with per capita local income tax revenues less than 75.0% of the statewide average receive grants, assuming that all counties impose a 2.54% local tax rate. Chapter 487 of 2009 capped each county’s funding under the program at the fiscal 2010 level. Chapter 425 further modified the program in order to provide a floor funding level in conjunction with the fiscal 2010 cap for an eligible county based on the income tax rate of that county. Beginning in fiscal 2014, an eligible county or Baltimore City may receive no more than the amount distributed in fiscal 2010 or a minimum of (1) 20.0% of the total grant if the local income tax rate is at least 2.8% but less than 3.0%; (2) 40.0% of the total grant if the rate is at least 3.0% but less than 3.2%; or (3) 60.0% of the total grant if the rate is set at 3.2%. The fiscal 2017 budget included $136.7 million in disparity grant funding; however, the Board of Public Works reduced total disparity grant funding to $132.8 million for fiscal 2017.

… Chapter 738 of 2016 altered the calculation of the Disparity Grant program for counties with a local income tax rate of 3.2% by increasing the minimum grant amount (funding floor) to 67.5% of the formula calculation in both fiscal 2018 and 2019. However, House Bill 152, modifies the formula by lowering the minimum grant amount (funding floor) from 67.5% to 63.75% of the formula calculation for fiscal 2018. Due to this action, funding for disparity grants will total $138.8 million in fiscal 2018.

Teachers Retirement Supplemental Grant

Grants totalling $27.7 million are distributed annually to nine counties to help offset the impact of sharing teachers’ retirement costs with the counties.

Gaming Impact Aid

From the proceeds generated by video lottery terminals at video lottery facilities in the State, generally 5.5% is distributed to local governments in which a video lottery facility is operating. … In addition, 5.0% of table game revenues are distributed to local jurisdictions where a video lottery facility is located. Gaming impact grants total $91.4 million in fiscal 2018, an increase of $24.6 million, or 36.9%, over fiscal 2017 levels, due to the opening of a casino in Prince George’s County in December 2016.

 

Other Direct Aid

Other direct aid may include aid from other programs such as those listed below, which are described in the Report:

Through the Maryland Forest Service and Maryland Park Service – Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) Program, counties receive 15 percent of the net revenues derived from their state forest or park land – in fiscal 2018, Forest Service payments to local governments total $282,900 and Park Service payments to local governments total $2.6 million.

The Senior Citizen Activities Center Operating Fund, a grant program through the Department of Aging for senior citizen activities centers, receives $764,000.

The Strategic Demolition Fund provides funding to assist with demolition, land assembly, housing development or redevelopment, and revitalization. Funding is awarded on a competitive basis to local governments and community development organizations. It receives $25.6 million, but $22.1 million is targeted for Baltimore City.

DLS 90 Day Report: Capital Budget

The Department of Legislative Services (DLS) has released its annual summary of the legislative session, The 90 Day Report – A Review of the 2017 Legislative SessionThe report is divided into 12 parts, each dealing with a major policy area. It also includes information relating to the final operating and capital budgets, including aid to local governments. 

Links to sections on the Capital Budget and relevant portions impacting local governments are provided below.

Capital Budget

From page A-63 on Revenue Bonds for the Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) Program:

A significant feature of the fiscal 2018 capital budget is a change in the funding mechanism for the Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) Program. In prior years, grants to local governments for upgrades of wastewater treatment plants to the BNR standard were funded with general obligation bonds. A provision in the BRFA of 2017 authorizes the use of up to $60 million of tax-supported revenue bonds from the Bay Restoration Fund (BRF) to fund BNR projects, while House Bill 384 (passed) permanently expands the allowable uses of the BRF to include BNR projects.

The fiscal 2018 capital budget bill de-authorizes $11 million of GO bonds authorized at the 2016 session for BNR projects and funds these projects and $49 million of new BNR projects from the revenue bond issuance.

The fiscal 2018 capital budget also includes $300 million of planned non-tax supported revenue bond issuances by MDE to further capitalize the Water Quality Revolving-Loan Fund and the Drinking Water Revolving Loan Fund to fund loans to local governments for various water quality and drinking water infrastructure projects. MDE will issue the debt over the next several years as project funding proposals from local governments dictate.

From page A-68:

Community colleges receive $59.6 million in fiscal 2018 GO bonds, or 14.9% of higher education funding. This includes $2.0 million of recycled GO bond funds leftover from prior local community college projects. Community college funding is also matched by $54.3 million in local support in fiscal 2018.

Exhibit L-2, Fiscal 2018 Public School Construction Funding (by Local Education Agency)

From page A-70 on School Construction:

The fiscal 2018 capital budget includes $347.5 million in GO bonds for public school construction. … The General Assembly also added language to the school construction authorization that, for fiscal 2018, IAC shall allocate 100% of the funds available for public school construction projects, including available contingency funds. Under the language, the IAC allocations are not subject to BPW approval and are deemed approved pursuant to State law. IAC made recommendations for 75% of the preliminary school construction allocation for fiscal 2018 in December 2016, which were approved by BPW on January 25, 2017. By March 1, 2017, IAC made recommendations for the allocation of 90% of the school construction allocation in the capital budget (which included the initial 75% approved by BPW). Following enactment of the capital budget bill, IAC will make recommendations for 100% of the funding available for fiscal 2018 school construction projects, and pursuant to this language, the IAC recommendations will be the final allocations not subject to BPW approval.

An additional $62.5 million is funded through the Capital Grant Program for Local School Systems with Significant Enrollment Growth or Relocatable Classrooms established by Chapter 355 of 2015. … In the 2017 session the General Assembly increased the amount authorized for the program by $22.5 million for a total of $62.5 million. … While § 5-313 of the Education Article establishes a funding formula for the eligible counties, the additional $22.5 million is allocated outside of the statutory formula with specific allocations to the participating jurisdictions set forth in the MCCBL of 2017. Significant enrollment growth is defined as having full-time equivalent enrollment growth that exceeds 150% of the statewide average over the past five years, and significant relocatable classrooms means an average of at least 300 relocatable classrooms over the past five years. Currently, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Howard, Montgomery, and Prince George’s counties are eligible.

Click here for information on school construction funding in Part L, Education.

From page A-70 on Aging Schools and Qualified Zone Academy Bond (QZAB) Programs

The capital budget bill provides $6.1 million in GO bonds for the Aging Schools Program allocated as grants to county boards of education as specified in § 5-206 of the Education Article. …

Public school construction funding is further supplemented with $4.823 million of QZABs authorized in House Bill 153. QZABs may be used in schools located in federal Enterprise or Empowerment Zones, or in schools in which 35% of the student population qualifies for FRPM. QZAB funds are distributed to local school systems through competitive grants including grants to the Breakthrough Center and public charter schools.

Dallas Dance Resigns as Baltimore County Schools Superintendent

Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance announced his resignation Tuesday, effective June 30.

He gave no reason for the resignation, and a spokesman said he is not leaving for another job.

According to The Baltimore Sun,

In a statement announcing his resignation, Dance said he believes the school system “is in a better place today then when I first arrived. “To that end, I now transition to another chapter of my career where I will specifically use my passion for equity and access to a quality education to ensure it is provided to all students through school, district, and community leadership.”

Dance, 35, was in the middle of his second contract with the school system — a four-year pact paying him $287,000 a year — that the school board approved last year.

School board president Edward Gilliss said it is too late in the year to do a search for a permanent replacement who would have to take the job on July 1. By state law, all school superintendents in Maryland have four year contracts that must begin on July 1.

“I think we are going to have to look toward an interim [superintendent],” Gilliss said. Because most of the appointed board will be replaced in a 2018 election, Gilliss said, “We should think about how to plan in light of those realities.”

Gilliss said he believes the county “has been fortunate to have Dr. Dance at the helm…for the last five years. I am sad to see his tenure end.”

Gilliss said he did not give the board a reason for the resignation. “But I know the board will have the challenge of deciding how to replace Dr. Dance and to make certain BCPS moves forward,” Gillis said.

Dance continued to have the support of the majority of the board on most votes. However, in the past year, new appointees to the board have grown increasingly critical of his proposals.

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz offered his own reflection, “In the last five years, we embarked upon a plan to build 16 new schools, 12 additions and multiple renovation projects,” said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. “We have increased our graduation rates. African-American and White students now graduate at the same rate in the Baltimore County Public Schools. And we have brought 21st century technologies to the classroom. We look forward to the next chapter of success for our school system.”

Read the full article for more information.

2017 End of Session Wrap-Up: Education

MACo advocates for school construction funding, and equity in K-12 and community college funding. The following segments describe MACo’s advocacy in this area in the 2017 General Assembly. 

Follow links for more coverage on Conduit Street and MACo’s Legislative Database

School Construction

Push Icons-WONMACo successfully supported passage of a bill that will allow the state to issue $4.8M in federal bonds for programs that fill an important niche in school construction. These programs cover small renovation and repair work in aging schools that do not always qualify for standard funding. Counties, who share funding responsibility for Maryland’s schools, appreciate additional support for their infrastructure goals. Senate Bill 197/House Bill 153 “Qualified Zone Academy Bonds,” passed and is awaiting the Governor’s signature. Bill InformationMACo Coverage

Income Tax Credit for Intern-Employers

Push Icons-NOT IDEALMACo supported a bill that allows businesses to receive a credit against the state income tax for employing interns enrolled in public and private nonprofit higher education institutions in the state. Counties appreciate that this bill offers a state-funded tax benefit, without a “spillover” residual effect on county revenues. Senate Bill 522/House Bill 1483 passed out of the Senate and is in the House Rules CommitteeBill InformationMACo Coverage

Grants Give Extra Cover for Pre-K and Declining Enrollments

Push Icons-WONMACo successfully supported passage of a bill that will provide $28.2 million in additional funding for K-12 public schools. The funding will be provided to: Allegany ($793,000), Calvert ($240,000), Carroll ($1.6 million), Cecil ($190,000), Garrett ($456,000), Harford ($356,000), Kent ($215,000), Queen Anne’s ($22,000), Somerset ($455,000), and Talbot ($133,000) Counties, and Baltimore City ($23.7 million). Senate Bill 1024/House Bill 684 passed, and the Governor signed it and has provided funding for it in a supplemental budget. Bill InformationMACo Coverage

Money for Meals All Summer Long

Push Icons-NOT IDEALMACo supported a bill that authorizes Summer Meals Program sponsors to apply for supplemental money from a competitive state-county matching grant fund to expand their ability to provide free and nutritious meals to children in need. Senate Bill 1161/House Bill 273 did not move out of committee in either house. Bill InformationMACo Coverage.

Counties Seek Greater Support for Community Colleges 

Push Icons-NOT IDEALMACo supported a bill to require both the county and the State to split the reimbursement of tuition assistance to ensure that the State is equally invested in the advancement of its students and workforce. Unfortunately, Senate Bill 678/House Bill 848 did not advance out of committees in either house. Bill InformationMACo Coverage

Push Icons-NOT IDEALMACo supported legislation that would have required the State to increase its funding so that by 2021 its aid to community colleges would reach 29% of the per-pupil general fund appropriation to students at 4-year public institutions of higher education. Senate Bill 152/House Bill 1069 did not move out of committee in either house. Bill InformationMACo Coverage

Push Icons-NOT IDEALMACo supported with amendments a bill would have established grants and scholarships for community colleges. In amendments, MACo asked that the legislation specifying how the grants would be funded. Senate Bill 869/House Bill 868 did not move out of committee in either house. Bill InformationMACo Coverage

School Funding Transparency

Push Icons-NOT IDEALMACo supported with amendments a bill that would have required a county government to establish an independent office to oversee the local school system if the system has received 10 or more repeat findings by the State Office of Legislative Audits. MACo asked that the legislation be amended to make it enabling, rather than mandatory, among other suggestions. House Bill 1341 did not pass out of committee. Bill InformationMACo Coverage

Click here for a round up of the wrap-ups for all policy areas