Skills to Pay the Bills: Chamber Partners With Schools to Address Workforce Shortage

As part of a joint effort with Garrett County Schools, the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce today announced the creation of a Work Ethic Diploma program. The purpose of the program is to ensure that the State is graduating skilled workers ready to take on the jobs offered by employers and industry.

According to Cumberland Times-News:

By meeting established criteria, local students will earn a work ethic diploma upon graduating that will guarantee them job interviews and better wages.

“The concept for a regional Garrett County work ethic initiative was brought to the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce by employers that felt students were not completing high school with the soft skills needed to be successful employees,” said Nicole Christian, chamber president and CEO. “With the input of area educators, business leaders and post-secondary representatives, standards were developed to measure work ethic in students.

To qualify for the diploma, students must earn a minimum of points in discipline standard, attendance standard, absence standard, work experience, community service/internship project standard, overall GPA standard, team work standard, drug free (optional) and exit interview (seniors only).

By meeting established criteria, local students will earn a Work Ethic Diploma upon graduating which will guarantee them job interviews and better wages.

Read the full article for more information.

Click here to learn more about the Work Ethic Diploma program.

Student Assessment Scores Hold Steady, Exclusion Rates On the Decline

Maryland student assessment scores held steady on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) for 2017, which included a significantly higher participation rate from students with disabilities (SD) and English language learners (ELL).

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America’s students know and can do in various subject areas.

NAEP policy guidelines include specific inclusion goals for NAEP samples. At the national, state, and district levels, the goal is to include 95 percent of all students selected for the NAEP samples, and 85 percent of those in the NAEP sample who are identified as SD or ELL.

Courtesy of MSDE

According to an MSDE press release:

Long criticized for a high number of students excluded from the NAEP testing population, Maryland has dramatically changed course. For the first time, the State met federal participation targets for both students with disabilities and English learners for each subject in both tested grades. Just four years ago, some exclusion rates were above 60 percent.

Fourth Grade Reading

The percentage of Maryland students scoring at or above the proficient level is at 40 percentage points, an increase of 8 percentage points since 2003. Nationally, scores improved six percentage points since 2003. The average fourth grade reading score in Maryland improved two points on the 500-point scale since 2015, from 223 to 225. Since 2003, the average Maryland public school score is up six points. This compares to a national increase of five points, rising from 216 to 221.

Eighth Grade Reading

The percentage of Maryland students scoring at or above the proficient level has increased seven percentage points since 2003 compared to a national improvement of five percentage points. The percentage of Maryland students scoring at or above proficient improved one point between 2015 and 2017. The average Maryland eighth grade reading score fell one point between 2015 and 2017 to 267, while the national average score increased one point to 265. Maryland’s average public school score has increased five points—from 262 to 267—since 2003, compared to a national score increase of four points—261 to 265.

Fourth Grade Mathematics

The percentage of Maryland students scoring at or above the proficient level in fourth grade math has improved 11 percentage points since 2003, from 31 percent to 42 percent, compared to national improvement of nine percentage points. The average Maryland public school test score on fourth grade mathematics improved from 239 to 241 since 2015. Since 2003, the average Maryland score has increased eight points. This compares to the average national score improvement of five points, from 234 to 239.

Eighth Grade Mathematics

The percentage of Maryland students scoring at or above the proficient level on the eighth grade mathematics exam has increased three percentage points since 2003, from 30 to 33 percent, compared to national improvement of seven percentage points. The average Maryland public school score fell two points between 2015 and 2017, from 283 to 281. Since 2003, the average Maryland score has increased three points. This compares to an increase in the average national score of six points, from 276 to 282.

Read the full press release for more information.

For detailed data on NAEP assessment scores, and to see how Maryland ranks nationally, visit the NAEP website.

Round-up of the 2018 Session for Counties

MACo’s legislative efforts earned an 80% success rate – and as usual, the counties’ voice makes a difference in Annapolis. Bills we support are more likely to pass, and bills we oppose are more likely to fail.

2018 Legislative Results Infographic

MACo’s legislative initiatives, priorities, and positions are directed by its Legislative Committee. This body comprises elected representatives from all of MACo’s members – the 24 county jurisdictions (including Baltimore City).

The “one county, one vote” system of deciding the Association’s legislative strategies, ensures that all counties have an equal voice. All 24 jurisdictions participated regularly in the weekly meetings throughout the session – where they also engaged with policy leaders and advocates who joined the meeting to address county leadership.

Our policy staff have compiled updates and results on all of the bills the Legislative Committee decided to take action on this year.

For the 2018 End of Session Wrap-up for each subject MACo covers, click below:

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Assessments and Taxation

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Business Affairs

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Disparity Grants

2018 End of Session Wrap-up: Economic Development Tax Credits

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Education

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Elections

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Employee Benefits & Relations

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Environmental Legislation

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Finance and Procurement

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Government Liability & Courts

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Health & Human Services

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Housing & Community Development

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Intergovernmental Relations *MACo Initiative Area*

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Parks & Recreation

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Pensions

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Planning & Zoning

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Property Taxes

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Public Information & Ethics * MACo Initiative Area *

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Public Safety and Corrections

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Road Funding * MACo Initiative Area *

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: School Construction * MACo Initiative Area *

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: State Budget & Fiscal Affairs

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Tax Sale Bills

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Transportation and Public Works

2018 End of Session Wrap-up: Wynne Tax Bills

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: County Tax Revenues

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Other Tax Bills

County Fellowship Aims to Develop “Pipeline of Talent”

The Allegany County Commissioners are set to provide on-the-job training to teach local college students about careers in local government. The 12-week fellowship program, which begins in May, is available to students at Frostburg State University and Allegany College of Maryland.

According to Cumberland Times-News,

“We’ve taken on county interns in the past, but not in this coordinated effort,” said Brandon Butler, the county administrator who will direct the program.  “I think this is a great opportunity,” Commissioner Bill Valentine said.

“This community has the rap of ‘My kid has to go somewhere else to get a good opportunity,’ and that is something I’m interested in busting,” he said.

“I’m looking to raise up young people who care about their communities, who have a passion to make a difference and have an an opportunity for them right here in Allegany County,” Butler said.

More than a unique opportunity for area students, the fellowship creates a “pipeline of talent,” as a way for local officials to spot potential government employees, Butler said.

To apply, college students must be either a junior or senior (at least 30 credits for ACM students) and have at least a 2.7 cumulative GPA.

Read the full article for more information.

Maryland Safe to Learn Act of 2018: What You Need to Know

SB 1265, Maryland Safe to Learn Act of 2018, passed the General Assembly on the final day of the 2018 legislative session and has been signed into law by Governor Larry Hogan. The legislation creates a variety of statewide standards and guidelines. The bill requires public high schools to have either a school resource officer or plans for adequate law enforcement coverage by the upcoming school year. Public middle and elementary schools will need to have either a school resource officer or plans for adequate law enforcement coverage in place prior to the 2019-2020 school year.

School Safety and Security Funding Overview

The 2018 Maryland General Assembly approved the following funding to enhance school safety:

One-Time Funding:

  • $2.5 million in safety assessment grants to be administered by the Maryland Center for School Safety
  • $10 million in MSDE administered school safety grants
  • $10 million in grants to be administered by the Maryland Interagency Committee on School Construction (IAC) for safety-related operating and capital projects
  • $10 million in school safety improvement grants provided in the capital budget

Permanent Funding:

  • $10 million in mandated funding in FY 2019 and beyond for school resource officers (SROs) and other local law enforcement strategies to provide adequate school coverage
  • $2.5 million for 13 new positions at the Maryland Center for School Safety

Total: $45 Million

SB 1265 – Maryland Safe to Learn Act of 2018

The following outline draws from the detailed analysis provided in the bill’s fiscal and policy note.

School Resource Officers

A school resource officer is defined as (1) a law enforcement officer assigned to a school in accordance with a memorandum of understanding between a local law enforcement agency and a local school system or (2) a Baltimore City School Police Officer, as defined in current law. By September 1, 2018, MCSS, in consultation with local school systems, must develop a specialized curriculum to be used in training SROs that addresses specified issues. The curriculum must be submitted to the Maryland Police Training and Standards Commission (MPTSC) for approval. By March 1, 2019, MCSS must develop and submit to MPTSC for approval a model training program based on the curriculum. Each local law enforcement agency must enroll SROs either in (1) the MCSS model training program or (2) a local training program approved by MPTSC that is consistent with the approved curriculum. All SROs must complete an approved specialized training program by September 1, 2019.

MCSS must collect specified data on SROs and, by December 15, 2018, develop guidelines based on its analysis of the data to assist local school systems in (1) determining the appropriate number and assignment of SROs, including supplemental coverage by local law enforcement agencies and (2) collaborating and communicating with local law enforcement agencies. By July 1, 2019, each local school system must develop a plan in
consultation with local law enforcement to implement the guidelines and submit its plan to MCSS for review and comment.

Beginning with the 2018-19 school year, and each school year thereafter, each local school system must file a report with MCSS before the school year begins that demonstrates (1) that each public school has an SRO assigned to the school or (2) if no SRO is assigned to a public school, that adequate local law enforcement coverage will be provided to the school. MCSS must submit annual summaries of the SRO reports it receives to the Governor and General Assembly.

School Safety Subcabinet and Advisory Board

  • The School Safety Subcabinet consists of the following individuals or their designees:
  • the State Superintendent of Schools;
  • the Secretary of Health;
  • the Secretary of State Police;
  • the Attorney General;
  • the Secretary of the Department of Disabilities; and
  • the Executive Director of the Interagency Committee on School Construction (IAC).

The State Superintendent or designee chairs the subcabinet and the Executive Director of MCSS provides staff.

The subcabinet is charged with multiple responsibilities, chief among them (1) collaborating with various stakeholders to provide a comprehensive, coordinated approach to school safety; (2) initiating collaborative partnerships and facilitating coordination among stakeholders to leverage existing resources to deliver school safety services uniformly to local school systems; (3) distributing grants from the Safe Schools Fund; and (4) adopting regulations to carry out its responsibilities. The subcabinet must submit an annual report with specified information.

The subcabinet is also given responsibility for making grants for security-related expenses to schools and child care centers at risk of hate crimes under Chapter 732 of 2016; the bill authorizes the Governor to transfer $1.0 million from the Governor’s Office on Crime Control and Prevention (GOCCP) to the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) for this purpose.

The School Safety Subcabinet Advisory Board is established and includes a broad array of stakeholders to advise and assist the subcabinet in carrying out its duties. A member of the advisory board may not receive compensation but is entitled to reimbursement of expenses.

Safe Schools Fund 

The existing School Safety Enforcement Fund in GOCCP is reconstituted as the Safe Schools Fund within MSDE, and the subcabinet is designated as the entity responsible for making grants from the fund. The fund retains its dedicated revenue source, consisting of a portion of penalties paid by uninsured motorists, which is set in statute at $600,000 in each fiscal year. The fund also includes any other money appropriated to it by the State budget and accrued interest. The fund may be used only to provide grants to local school systems to enhance school safety, as specified by the bill.

The bill authorizes the Governor to transfer to the Safe Schools Fund by budget amendment (1) $10.0 million in funds reserved in the fiscal 2019 operating budget for school safety operating grants to local school systems and (2) $2.5 million reserved for grants to local school systems for the safety evaluations. Any of these monies not transferred to the Safe Schools Fund in fiscal 2019 revert to the general fund.

Grants awarded to local school systems are supplemental to any State funds that would otherwise be appropriated to the local school systems.

Model Policy for Assessment Teams

By September 1, 2018, the subcabinet must develop a model policy for the establishment of one or more assessment teams in each local school system. The model policy must include specified provisions generally related to (1) the identification of, and intervention with, students or other individuals who may pose a threat to school safety; (2) the composition and appropriate number of assessment teams within local school systems; and (3) training for the assessment teams.

By September 1, 2019, each local school system must adopt a policy for the establishment of assessment teams that is consistent with the model policy. Local policies must include:

  • a process for regular assessment and intervention, including diversion and de-escalation, if an individual exhibits behavior that may pose a threat to school safety;
  • standards for timely response and procedures for coordination among members of the team, including referral of relevant information to  appropriate authorities; and
  • standards and procedures for the referral of an individual for evaluation, services, or treatment when appropriate.

School Safety Evaluations and Emergency Plans

Each local school system must designate a school safety coordinator, who must be certified by MCSS and serve as the liaison between the local school system, local law enforcement, and MCSS. By June 15, 2019, and regularly thereafter, each local school system must conduct a safety evaluation of each school to (1) identify and, if necessary, develop solutions for physical safety concerns and (2) identify and evaluate any patterns of safety concerns on school property or at school-sponsored events. In conducting the safety evaluations, each safety coordinator must consult with MCSS, coordinate with IAC, and submit a summary of the completed evaluations to MCSS.

MSDE must update the Emergency Planning Guidelines for Local School Systems by December 1, 2019, to reflect the initial findings from local safety evaluations.

By July 1, 2020, and regularly thereafter, each local school system must update the school emergency plan for each public school. The plans must conform to the MSDE guidelines regarding how the school will address behavioral threats and emergency events. In updating the plans, local school systems must work with MCSS to correct any identified weaknesses.

School safety evaluations, emergency plans, and local law enforcement coverage policies are not subject to inspection under the Maryland Public Information Act, except by designated State agencies, emergency management agencies, and local law enforcement in the performance of their official duties.

Mental Health Services 

By September 1, 2018, each local school system must appoint a mental health services coordinator to coordinate existing mental health services and referral procedures within the local school system. Working with specified local entities, the coordinator must (1) ensure that a student who is referred for mental health services obtains the necessary services; (2) maximize external funding for mental health and wraparound services, as defined by the bill; and (3) develop plans for delivering behavioral health and wraparound services to students who exhibit specified behaviors of concern. Grants from the Safe Schools Fund may be used to develop plans for delivering mental health and wraparound services. 

The bill requires the subcabinet to review the local plans for delivering behavioral health and wraparound services (discussed above) and identify gaps in the availability of services and providers for school-age children in the State by December 1, 2018. It also requires the Kirwan Commission to include in its final report (due December 31, 2018) recommendations for additional mental health and wraparound services in local school systems and funding required for those services.

Safety Drills for Public Schools and Public Institutions of Higher Education

MSDE, in consultation with the subcabinet, may adopt regulations to incorporate age-appropriate components of the Active Shooter Preparedness Program developed by the federal Department of Homeland Security (DHS) or guidelines developed by the Maryland Active Assailant Work Group into the annual schedule of school safety drills. MSDE must notify the Governor and the Legislative Policy Committee of any changes to the schedule of drills in regulation. Local school systems must collaborate with local law enforcement agencies to establish policies for responding to an emergency at each public school.

Beginning with the 2018-19 academic year, and annually thereafter, each public institution of higher education must complete at least one active shooter drill.

Maryland Center for School Safety

MCSS is made an independent unit within MSDE; the bill authorizes the Governor to transfer by budget amendment funds appropriated and 14 positions authorized in the fiscal 2019 operating budget from the Department of State Police to MSDE to complete the transfer. MCSS is based at the Maryland Coordination and Analysis Center and must establish a satellite office at Bowie State University. The mandated appropriation for MCSS’s operations is increased from $500,000 to $2.0 million annually. The bill transfers some of the center’s existing duties to the subcabinet, and adds the following duties to MCSS’s charge (some of which are also described above):

  • assist local school systems to identify resources and implement training for students and parents about relationship violence, identifying the signs of unhealthy relationships, and preventing relationship violence;
  • analyze data on SROs and develop guidelines for local school systems regarding the assignment and training of SROs;
  • certify school safety coordinators;
  • consult with local school systems on safety evaluations;
  • review and comment on school emergency plans; and
  • report on life-threatening incidents that occur on public school grounds.

Each local school system must promptly inform MCSS of any critical, life-threatening incidents that occur on school grounds and invite the center to participate in a required after-action review of the incident. At the conclusion of the review, the local school system must file a report with MCSS, and the center must report to the Governor and General Assembly on lessons learned from the incident and any recommendations for improving school safety.

Questions? Please contact Kevin Kinnally at MACo for more information.

Montgomery Initiates 45-Day Action Plan to Improve School Safety

A 45-day action plan for enhancing safety and security in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) calls for retrofitting classroom doors and requiring students to participate in more school safety drills.

MCPS has been actively assessing its safety measures and recently published an interim report on security at high schools. Now, MCPS is publishing its complete findings, which cover safety issues in elementary and middle schools.

According to Bethesda Magazine:

“For the past six weeks, stakeholders across Montgomery County have come together in a variety of forums to discuss what more can be done, both immediately and over the long-term, to prevent a school shooting from occurring in one of our schools,” the report stated.

The report includes the action plan for the next 45 days, which will start Thursday. On the to-do list is adding door lock magnets that will enable teachers to secure their classrooms from the inside. MCPS spokeswoman Gboyinda Onijala said classrooms currently are locked from the outside.

The school system also wants to distribute classroom keys to substitute teachers, write guidelines for security in portable classrooms, conduct facility safety visits at every school and check access control systems for any needed repairs. MCPS will send the County Council a budget request for money to spend on safety projects and will review emergency protocols and school onsite emergency team procedures.

Finally, schools will go above and beyond state requirements for safety drills and make sure to practice active-shooter responses. Onijala said under state mandates, schools have to conduct at least six scenario-based drills per year, but they have freedom to choose the type of emergency response they’re practicing.

Senate Bill 1265, a measure to improve school safety in Maryland, passed the General Assembly on the final day of the 2018 legislative session and has been signed into law by Governor Larry Hogan. The legislation creates a variety of standards and guidelines statewide. The bill would require public high schools to have either a school resource officer or plans for adequate law enforcement coverage by the upcoming school year. Public middle and elementary schools will need to have either a school resource officer or plans for adequate law enforcement coverage in place prior to the 2019-2020 school year.

Useful Links

Read the full article in Bethesda Magazine

MCPS School Safety and Security Interim Report

MCPS School Safety and Security Final Report

2018 End of Session Wrap-Up: Education

The segments below provide a brief overview of MACo’s work in the area of education policy in the 2018 General Assembly. 

Follow links for more coverage on Conduit Street and MACo’s Legislative Database

Counties Support Kirwan Commission’s Preliminary Recommendations

MACo supported a bill to implement the preliminary recommendations of the [Kirwan] Commission On Innovation and Excellence in Education. As a precursor to the Kirwan Commission’s final report, HB 1415/SB 1092 would establish a comprehensive teacher recruitment and outreach program, the Maryland Early Literacy Initiative, the Learning in Extended Academic Programs (LEAP) grant program, and the Career and Technology Education (CTE) Innovation grant program. Additionally, the bill would ensure funding for current prekindergarten grant programs and the Teaching Fellows for Maryland scholarship program. The bill was passed General Assembly and awaits the Governor’s signature. Bill Information | MACo Coverage

Counties Support Legislation to Expand the Maryland Technology Internship Program

MACo supported a bill that would enable counties to participate in the Maryland Technology Internship program. Currently, the Program connects college and university students, recent graduates, and veterans with small innovative businesses in the high-growth technology sector through internships. The Program incentivizes businesses to participate by offering a stipend of up to 50% for each paid intern. HB 527/  would expand the current Program by authorizing the State and local governments to participate in the same way as technology-based businesses. The bill passed the General Assembly and awaits the Governor’s signature. Bill Information | MACo Coverage

Counties Look To Bolster Support for Community Colleges

MACo supported a bill that would have increased funding for community colleges from the State under the Cade formula beginning in FY 2020. This legislation requires the State to increase its contribution to Maryland’s community colleges. However, neither House Bill 516 or Senate Bill 596 made it out of committee in either house.

Bill Information | MACo Coverage

Push Icons-MORE WORKSenate Bill 303 would have increased state funding for community colleges beginning in 2020. MACo supported this measure to offset unfunded state mandates for tuition and residency waivers, signaling a new commitment to community colleges on behalf of the State. The bill did not advance out of the Senate Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs committee.

Bill Information | MACo Coverage

Counties Oppose One-Size-Fits-All Collective Bargaining Mandate

Push Icons-DEFEATEDMACo opposed House Bill 667 and Senate Bill 408. The two bills would have established a uniform statewide collective bargaining process for community college employees. This legislation would not have provided local flexibility in the decision to allow collective bargaining at county community colleges, and imposed a one-size-fits-all approach to local collective bargaining. The Senate version of the bill received an unfavorable report from the Senate Finance committee and did not advance. Bill Information | MACo Coverage

Counties Oppose Legislation to Require Local Health Departments to Substantially Expand Student Vision Screenings

MACo opposed a bill that would require local boards of education and local health departments to substantially expand student vision screenings. The new screenings would be designed to detect a wide swath of possible symptoms indicating potential vision disorders. Counties were concerned the legislation would have placed a substantial administrative and cost burden onto local health departments. Without state resources to offset these potentially large costs, the bill represented an unfunded mandate on local governments. Language requiring local boards of education and local health departments substantially expand student vision screenings was removed from the bill. The bill passed the General Assembly and awaits the Governor’s signature. Bill Information | MACo Coverage

For more information on education legislation tracked by MACo during the 2018 legislative session, click here.

General Assembly Approves Community College Promise Program

Program earmarks $15 million in need-based tuition aid, more than doubles current funding levels

The Maryland General Assembly approved HB 16 – Community Colleges – Near Completers and Maryland Community College Promise Scholarships, legislation that would more than double state scholarship money available to low-income community college students late Monday night, with just minutes remaining in the 2018 legislative session. In order to be eligible for the program, students must be Maryland residents, recently graduated from high school, meet certain G.P.A., income, and other requirements, and attend community college full-time.

HB 16 would apply to students who enroll in community college in the fall of 2019. The bill currently awaits the Governor’s signature.

According to a MACC press release:

“This program will be a game-changer for many of our students, we certainly hope Governor Hogan signs it,” said Dr. Bernie Sadusky, Executive Director of the Maryland Association of Community Colleges. “MACC congratulates the 2018 legislature for its leadership and investment in Maryland’s economic future by passing a program to help more Marylanders prepare for a rapidly changing labor market.”

By 2020, 69% of Maryland jobs will require a postsecondary education according to the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce*. About 37% of Maryland adults lack any postsecondary education.

Across the U.S., there are currently over 200 College Promise programs in 44 states. These programs motivate students to do well in high school, remove barriers to a postsecondary education, and can expedite entrance to the middle class through preparation for well-paying careers.

Read the full press release for more information.

Conduit Street Podcast: Sine Die Is Quickly Approaching… What’s Locked Up? What’s Still Lingering?

On the latest episode of the Conduit Street Podcast, Kevin Kinnally and Michael Sanderson discuss a number of issues that have been resolved by the General Assembly as well as a number of issues that still require attention. MACo has made the podcast available through both iTunes and Google Play Music by searching Conduit Street Podcast. You can also listen on our Conduit Street blog with a recap and link to the podcast.

Listen here:

Show Notes:

What’s Locked Up?

  • Amazon Incentive Package
  • Tax Cut Package
  • School Construction Sage
  • Same-Day Voter Registration

What’s Left?

  • School Safety Legislation
  • Crime Bill Blowup
  • Education Lockbox… Limbo?
  • Cannabis (and Quirky Zoning Sideshow)

You can listen to previous episodes of the Conduit Street Podcast on our website.

School Safety Bill Clears Senate

The Maryland Senate gave final approval Thursday to SB 1265, a bill that would require a resource officer or otherwise adequate law enforcement coverage at all public schools by the start of next school year. The Senate voted 44-0 for the bill, sending it to the House of Delegates.

The original bill would have required only public high schools to either have a school resource officer or assurances of adequate law enforcement coverage by the start of the next school year. Senator Michael Hough proposed an amendment to expand the requirement to all schools. The amendment narrowly passed the Senate, by a vote of 23-22.

The FY 2019 operating budget includes an assortment of school safety funds, including $2.5 million in safety assessment grants to be administered by the Maryland Center for School Safety (and another $2.5 million for 13 new positions at the Center); $10 million in MSDE administered school safety grants; and an additional $10 million in grants to be administered by the IAC for safety-related operating and capital projects. This totals $22.5 million in new school safety funding for local school systems and is in addition to the $10 million in school safety improvement grants provided in the capital budget.

Stay tuned to Conduit Street for more information.