Local Management Boards Get Needed Boost in Funding

MACo worked during the 2022 legislative session to help secure increased funding for local management boards. The State increased funding for the awards this year by $4.5 million, including $1.5 million for local care team coordinators who ensure that youth with intensive needs receive the appropriate services. 

On July 8, the Governor’s Office of Crime Prevention, Youth, and Victim Services awarded $23 million in funding for local management boards (LMBs) in support of children and families across Maryland. Maryland increased funding for the awards this year by $4.5 million, including $1.5 million for local care team coordinators who ensure that youth with intensive needs receive the appropriate services.

In total, counties were awarded $23,291,148, including the additional $1.5 million for local care team coordinators.

Count breakdown of this year’s LMB funding:

  • Allegany: $615,151
  • Anne Arundel: $1,604,776
  • Baltimore City: $3,602,599
  • Baltimore County: $1,778,482
  • Calvert: $536,744
  • Caroline: $722,023
  • Carroll: $674,072
  • Cecil: $697,143
  • Charles: $528,404
  • Dorchester: $537,394
  • Frederick: $533,404
  • Garrett: $703,539
  • Harford: $687,619
  • Howard: $620,562
  • Kent: $543,666
  • Montgomery: $1,904,090
  • Prince George’s: $2,158,964
  • Queen Anne’s: $438,144
  • St. Mary’s: $530,488
  • Somerset: $394,344
  • Talbot: $624,321
  • Washington: $866,202
  • Wicomico: $996,773
  • Worcester: $992,214

Established in the 1990s, LMBs are quasi-authorities of local government. LMBs empower local authorities to plan, implement, and monitor service programs for organizations that serve youth and families. Active in each jurisdiction, the boards collaborate with local stakeholders and agencies to support many aspects of child and family services, including reducing the impact of incarceration on communities, reducing youth homelessness and child hunger, and preventing out-of-state residential placements.

Each county has an LMB, but models vary. In some counties, LMBs are functions of local government, in others, the LMB responsibilities are contracted out to local nonprofits, while others operate a hybrid of the two.

LMBs serve many functions in their local communities, but a state website highlights some of their major impacts to-date, including:

  • Led the way in returning and diverting children from out-of-state residential placements;
  • Administered funding for interagency services provided to children at-risk of out-of-home placements;
  • Increased collaboration between local stakeholders and agencies serving children and families; and
  • Served as the coordinating and administering agency for programs that serve the community including School-Based Health Centers, C-Safe, Youth Strategies Initiative, Maryland Afterschool Opportunity Fund, Home Visiting/Healthy Families, etc.

Read the full press release.

Learn more about LMBs.

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