State Department of Labor Received $1.2 M for Workforce Programs

The Maryland Department of Labor was awarded more than $1.2 million in state funds to grow its Employment Advancement Right Now (EARN) Maryland program.

The Maryland Department of Labor’s EARN program is a  workforce solution that helps businesses cultivate the skilled workforce they need to compete while preparing Marylanders for meaningful careers.The $1.2 million award was announced on June 13 by Maryland Labor Secretary Tiffany P. Robinson.

According to a Department press release:

EARN Maryland awards funding to strategic industry partnerships comprised of employers, non-profits, higher education, local workforce development boards, and local governments. Based upon employer-identified training needs, partnerships provide education and skills training to unemployed and underemployed Marylanders. The program also provides career advancement strategies for incumbent workers, leading to a more highly skilled workforce. The 10 partnerships announced today are comprised of more than 70 employer partners and will train nearly 400 Marylanders for in-demand careers in industries such as healthcare and information technology.

In recent years, funding for the EARN program has more than doubled, with added investments in cyber, green, and clean jobs training. Notably, according to the Department, the program has been recognized as a national best practice by the National Skills Coalition, Urban Alliance, and the Deloitte Center for Government Insights.

More than 7,000 individuals trained through EARN have successfully obtained employment and over 10,000 incumbent workers have participated in in-demand training opportunities. Furthermore, according to the Department, “a recent study on the economic impact of EARN found that for every dollar the state invests into the program, an additional $16.78 in economic activity is created. The national average for programs similar to EARN is estimated to be approximately $3.41.”

Read the full press release.

Learn more about Maryland’s EARN program.

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