DHMH Launches Education Campaign to Raise Substance Abuse Awareness

Given a significant increase in overdose deaths in Maryland, the State has ramped up its efforts to address and bring awareness to the issue. As noted in a StateStat announcement:

In response to the increase in overdose deaths, DHMH has also launched a public education campaign to raise awareness about substance abuse, substance abuse prevention, and programs and services available for individuals struggling with substance abuse. Traditionally viewed as an inner-city problem, substance abuse and overdose deaths have extended to all parts of Maryland including rural and suburban areas. Fifteen counties and Baltimore City experienced an increase in overdose deaths in 2013, and fourteen counties had ten or more overdose deaths in 2013.Drug Related Deaths - courtesty MD StateStat

Drug Related Deaths – Courtesy MD StateStat

As previously reported on Conduit Street, the Department of Mental Health and Hygiene (DHMH) recently released an annual report on Maryland’s drug use. Additionally, Governor Martin O’Malley created an Overdose Prevention Council to tackle the State’s drug problem. The Council is charged in part with advising the Governor on a statewide plan to reduce fatal and non-fatal overdoses as well as developing recommendations for policies, regulations or legislation to address the opioid overdose epidemic.

More information about the public education campaign and other DHMH overdose prevention initiatives can be found on the DHMH website.

Data related to substance abuse and the Governor’s goal to reduce overdose deaths by 20% by 2015 can be found on the StateStat website.

Substance abuse, particularly opioid abuse, will be discussed at MACo’s Summer Conference in two sessions – one looking at the issue from a public health perspective, and one from a public safety perspective.

Learn more about MACo’s 2014 Summer Conference:

Contact Meetings & Events Director Virginia White with questions about Summer Conference.

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