Prince George’s County Primary Round-Up

County Executive

Current State’s Attorney Angela Alsobrooks won a decisive victory in the Prince George’s County Executive race, establishing a full majority with nearly 62% of the vote from a nine-member field with multiple credentialed candidates. Among the other candidates included former Congressional representative Donna Edwards, current State Senator C. Anthony Muse, and one-time Lieutenant Governor Sam Bogley.

Alsobrooks has served since 2014 as Prince George’s County State’s Attorney, the first woman and the youngest official to serve in that role. After graduation from the University of Maryland Law School, Angela began her career as a Prince George’s County Assistant State’s Attorney in 1997, eventually becoming the county’s first full-time prosecutor assigned to handle domestic violence cases where she tried, and successfully prosecuted scores of cases against violent offenders. She has also served as an education liaison for Prince George’s County.

County Council

At-Large

Incumbent Councilmember Mel Franklin and Calvin Hawkins won the Democratic nomination for the council’s two new at-large seats. Franklin received 41,565 votes or 20.7% of the vote while Hawkins received 37,566 votes or 18.7% of the vote. Franklin and Hawkins will face Felicia Folarin, who was unopposed in the Republican primary, in the general election.

District 1

Tom Dernoga defeated Craig Moe to capture the Democratic primary in District 1. Dernoga received 5,215 votes or 52.3% of the votes, while Moe received 4,755 votes or 47.7% of the vote. Dernoga does not have a Republican challenger in the general election.

District 2

Incumbent Councilmember Deni Taveras captured the Democratic primary in District 2. Taveras received 3,450 votes or 52.9% of the vote. Taveras does not have a Republican challenger in the general election.

District 3

Council Chair Danielle Glaros retains her District 3 council seat, as she was unopposed in the primary election and does not have a Republican challenger in the general election.

District 4

Incumbent Councilmember Todd Turner retains his District 4 council seat, as he was unopposed in the primary election and does not have a Republican challenger in the general election.

District 5

Jolene Ivey prevailed in a five-way District 5 Democratic primary. Ivey received 9,169 votes or 73.7% of the vote. Ivey does not have a Republican challenger in the general election.

District 6

Incumbent Councilmember Derrick Leon Davis will retain his District 6 council seat, as he won the Democratic primary with 9,935 votes or 77.4% of the vote. Davis does not have a Republican challenger in the general election.

District 7

Rodney Colvin Streeter holds a slight lead against Krystal Oriadha in the Democratic primary for the District 7 council seat. Streeter got 2,710 votes or 26.6% of the votes while Oriadha received 2,701 votes or 26.5% of the vote. There is no Republican running in the general election.

District 8

Monique Anderson-Walker edged out Prince George’s County Delegate Tony Knotts to capture the Democratic nomination for the District 8 council seat. Anderson-Walker received 7,608 votes or 51.2% of the vote while Knotts received 5,108 votes or 34.4% of the votes. There is no Republican challenger in the general election.

District 9

Sydney Harrison captured the Democratic nomination in District 9 with 6,913 votes or 34.7% of the vote. There is no Republican challenger in the general election.

State’s Attorney

Aisha Braveboy won the Democratic primary with 74,824 votes or 62.9% of the vote. Braveboy defeated Prince George’s County Senator Victor Ramirez and D. Michael Lyles to secure the nomination. Braveboy does not face a Republican challenger in the general election.

Sheriff

Melvin C. High won the Democratic Primary with 60,538 votes or 52.1% of the vote. High does not face a Republican challenger in the general election.

MACo’s election coverage and analysis relies, as always, on unofficial results published by the State Board of Elections. Official results will follow, after a full accounting of pending ballots. Given the larger-than-usual expected number of provisional ballots (which would not be included in the unofficial vote total), readers are advised that any close unofficial results are subject to realignment in the days ahead.

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