Fun Fact: Did You Know that The Maryland State House is the Oldest State Capitol Still in Continuous Legislative Use?

Question: Did you know that The Maryland State House is the oldest state capitol still in continuous legislative use? It’s true! The Maryland State House is the oldest state capitol still in continuous legislative use and is the only state house ever to have served as the nation’s capitol. The Continental Congress met in the Old Senate Chamber from November 26, 1783, to August 13, 1784. During that time, George Washington came before Congress to resign his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and the Treaty of Paris was ratified, marking the official end of the Revolutionary War.

The capitol has the distinction of being topped by the largest wooden dome in the United State constructed without nails. The current building, which was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960, is the third statehouse on its site.

The State House is where the Maryland General Assembly convenes for three months each year, and the elected leadership of the state — the governor, lieutenant governor, speaker of the House of Delegates and president of the Senate — all have their offices there.

Source: Maryland State Archives

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