Baltimore County Announces New Online Code Enforcement System with Citizen Access

Baltimore County launched a new “online system that offers residents unprecedented access to Code Enforcement case updates while streamlining administrative functions, enhancing the County’s efficiency and reducing costs.”

From Baltimore County’s news release,

This is the latest module implemented as part of the County’s new $1.13 million technology platform that integrates Geographical Information System (GIS) data with agency workflow systems, maximizing efficiencies and supporting business decisions while also increasing transparency and offering better customer service and access. These automations improve overall data integrity and reduce the costs and wasted time related to manual data entry and analysis.

“This new Code Enforcement tracking and management system is the next step in making County government more efficient and cost-effective, while enabling citizens to communicate with us 24 hours a day, seven days a week,” Kamenetz said. “This field-based system means that our Code Enforcement inspectors can spend a lot more time out in the field inspecting and less time in the office doing paperwork. Plus it offers community members instant access to track our enforcement efforts.”

The system empowers citizens, giving them immediate confirmation when they submit a complaint, direct notification of inspections and correction notices, and, if necessary, details of enforcement actions and hearings.

The new system outfits County Code Inspectors with iPad notepad computers to develop their daily routes, investigate and report on complaints, request correction notices, take photographs and generate re-inspection dates. This new field-based capability eliminates the need for inspectors to spend hours each day in the office doing paperwork and printing and filing hard copies of photos and reports. The County projects savings of about $75,000 per year in printing and paper supplies alone, more than offsetting the $18,400 cost for the inspectors’ iPads.

To read the full release, visit Baltimore County’s website.

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